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Novak Djokovic has been moved to a detention hotel used to house refugees and asylum seekers after the world No 1 had his visa cancelled.

The Serbian is being held at the Park Hotel in Carlton, Melbourne after his lawyers secured permission for him to remain in the country after being initially barred on Wednesday. 

There will be a court hearing on Monday to determine whether he is deported, so what is his current situation, and what chance does he have of staying in Australia? Sportsmail's MIKE DICKSON answers the key questions...

World No 1 Novak Djokovic has been moved to a detention hotel used to house refugees

World No 1 Novak Djokovic has been moved to a detention hotel used to house refugees

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Where is Novak now?

He is being held in a modest detention hotel in Melbourne's northern suburbs, along with refugees and asylum-seekers. 

He is confined to a room that is said to have insects roaming around, and was denied permission to move into an apartment rented by his support team. 

He does not have his wallet, and his luggage is still at the airport.

He's being held in a decidedly modest detention hotel in Melbourne's northern suburbs

He's being held in a decidedly modest detention hotel in Melbourne's northern suburbs

 

What is his case?

On Thursday a federal court ruled he could stay in Australia until Monday, when there will be a legal hearing. 

He was barred when arriving on Wednesday night. His Australian lawyers successfully applied for an injunction temporarily preventing his deportation, and that was not contested by Australia's government.

 

Why was he barred?

Djokovic is unvaccinated and thought he had secured a medical exemption on the grounds he says he has had Covid in the past six months. 

Two panels of experts set up by Tennis Australia and Victoria State government ruled that this qualified him to be let in.

There are questions about Tennis Australia's involvement in a process that was meant to be 'blind' to an applicant's identity. Australia's Border Force have a different interpretation of the guidelines set by the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation. 

Border Force deemed he did not have enough credible paperwork to back up the visa which had been issued.

Australia's Border Force have a different interpretation of the guiding principles (pic, Djokovic at the airport in Melbourne)

Australia's Border Force have a different interpretation of the guiding principles (pic, Djokovic at the airport in Melbourne) 

 

What chance does he have of staying?

His lawyers think they can convince the judge. They will point out three overseas personnel connected to the Australian Open were given exemptions on the same grounds. However, Border Force sources said all applications are different, and that the others provided sounder evidence.

Former Australian immigration chief Abul Rizvi believes Djokovic can be successful by questioning why he was allowed to enter the country in the first place.

'If I were Djokovic's lawyer, there would be three questions I would be asking,' explained Rizvi. 

'The first, if he had not met the legal requirements for a visa, why did you grant him a visa? The second, if you had concerns, why did you not cancel the visa prior to him boarding a plane? The third, given that none of the circumstances have changed, on what basis can you cancel that visa?'

A former Australian immigration chief believes Djokovic can successfully challenge his deportation

A former Australian immigration chief believes Djokovic can successfully challenge his deportation

 

What happens next?

If Djokovic wins he will be free to leave his accommodation and play in the Open. If he loses he will be deported, probably later the same day. 

Not only that but there is a chance he could be banned from trying to enter Australia for another three years, making it unlikely he would compete again in Melbourne, where he has won the title nine times.

 

If he stays, can he win the Australian Open?

Having been on a flight for 24 hours, then held at the airport, then confined to a hotel and denied practice facilities, his carefully constructed preparation is bound to be affected. He will have been inactive for almost a week.

Given the outrage among many at his presence, egged on by politicians, he is also likely to get a hostile crowd reception.

If he wins he will be free to leave his accommodation and play in the Australian Open

If he wins he will be free to leave his accommodation and play in the Australian Open

Source : https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/sportsnews/article-10376431/NOVAK-DJOKOVIC-Q-going-case-legal-fight-stay-Australia.html

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NOVAK DJOKOVIC Q&A: What is going on, what is the case for his legal fight to remain in Australia, what chance does he have of staying in the country, and what happens when he ...

Source:Daily Mail

NOVAK DJOKOVIC Q&A: What is going on, what is the case for his legal fight to remain in Australia, what chance does he have of staying in the country, and what happens when he ...